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Important Updates

AP Seminar Updates and New Resources for 2019-20

To help more students prepare for—and succeed on—the AP Seminar Exam, we’re introducing new resources for your classroom for the 2019-20 school year. We’ve also moved exam registration to the fall, a best practice that improves students’ chances of earning college credit and placement.

Learn more about changes coming to AP in the 2019-20 school year.

New AP Resources
AP Classroom is now available. Designed with AP educators, it helps you provide students daily practice and personalized feedback throughout the year. Sign in to access your question bank. Students can also access the AP Digital Portfolio through AP Classroom.

Sign In to AP Classroom

Course Overview

AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Students learn to investigate a problem or issue, analyze arguments, compare different perspectives, synthesize information from multiple sources, and work alone and in a group to communicate their ideas.

Course Content

Based on the Understanding by Design (Wiggins and McTighe) model, this curriculum framework is intended to provide a clear and detailed description of the course requirements necessary for student success. This conceptualization will guide the development and organization of learning outcomes from general to specific, resulting in focused statements about content knowledge and skills needed for success in the course. As always, you have the flexibility to organize the course content as you like.

The AP Seminar curriculum is made up of five big ideas.

  • Big Idea 1: Question and Explore
  • Big Idea 2: Understand and Analyze 
  • Big Idea 3: Evaluate Multiple Perspectives
  • Big Idea 4: Synthesize Ideas
  • Big Idea 5: Team, Transform, and Transmit

Course Skills

The AP Seminar framework included in the course and exam description outlines distinct skills, called transferable skills and proficiencies, that students should practice throughout the year.

Skill Proficiencies

Analyze Sources and Evidence

Understand and Analyze Argument

Identifying the main idea in arguments, analyzing the reasoning, and evaluating the validity of the conclusions

Evaluate Sources and Evidence

Evaluating the credibility and relevance of sources and the evidence they present

Construct an Evidence-Based Argument

Establish Argument

Developing a well-reasoned argument clearly connecting the thesis, claims, and evidence

Select and Use Evidence

Strategically choosing evidence to effectively support claims

Understand Context and Perspective

Understand and Analyze Context

Understanding the complexity of a problem or issue and connecting arguments to the broader context in which they are situated

Understand and Analyze Perspective

Comparing and interpreting multiple diverse perspectives on an issue to understand its complexity

Communicate (interpersonal and intrapersonal)

Engage Audience

Choosing and employing effective written and oral communication techniques, considering audience, context, and purpose

Apply Conventions

Choosing and consistently applying an appropriate citation style and effective conventions of writing

Collaborate

Working constructively with others to accomplish a team goal or task

Reflect

Articulating challenges, successes, and moments of insight that occur throughout the inquiry process

AP and Higher Education

Higher education professionals play a key role developing AP courses and exams, setting credit and placement policies, and scoring student work. The AP Higher Education site features information on recruitment and admission, advising and placement, and more.

Meet the Development Committee for AP Seminar.