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Important Updates

New Teaching and Assessing Module for the Redesigned Course and Exam
The first, second, and third Teaching and Assessing AP U.S. Government and Politics modules are now available.

New Secure Practice Exam and Student Samples
A new AP U.S. Government and Politics practice exam reflecting the 2018-19 redesign is available through your AP Course Audit account. Log in and click Secure Documents in the Resources section of your Course Status page.

Two sets of annotated sample student responses to the free-response questions in the practice exam from the CED are also available: one as a public document on this page, and one as a secure document through your AP Course Audit account.

AP U.S. Government and Politics Redesign
This page has been updated to align with the AP U.S. Government and Politics redesign, launching in fall 2018.

Exam Overview

The AP U.S. Government and Politics Exam measures students’ understanding of required content. Students must be able to define, compare, explain, and interpret political concepts, policies, processes, perspectives, and behaviors that characterize the U.S. political system.

Encourage your students to visit the AP U.S. Government and Politics student page for exam information and exam practice.

Exam Format

Section I

Multiple Choice — 55 Questions | 1 Hour, 20 Minutes | 50% of Exam Score

  • Quantitative Analysis: Analysis and application of quantitative-based source material
  • Qualitative Analysis: Analysis and application of text-based (primary and secondary) sources
  • Visual Analysis: Analysis and application of qualitative visual information
  • Concept Application: Explanation of the application of political concepts in context
  • Comparison: Explanation of the similarities and differences of political concepts
  • Knowledge: Identification and definition of political principles, institutions, processes, policies, and behaviors

Section II

Free Response — 4 Questions | 1 Hour, 40 Minutes | 50% of Exam Score

  • Concept Application: Respond to a political scenario, explaining how it relates to a political principle, institution, process, policy, or behavior
  • Quantitative Analysis: Analyze quantitative data, identify a trend or pattern, draw a conclusion for the visual representation, and explain how it relates to a political principle, institution, process, policy, or behavior
  • SCOTUS Comparison: Compare a nonrequired Supreme Court case with a required Supreme Court case, explaining how information from the required case is relevant to that in the nonrequired one
  • Argument Essay: Develop an argument in the form of an essay, using evidence from one or more required foundational documents

Exam Questions and Scoring Information

For free-response questions from 2018 and earlier, along with scoring information, visit the Past Exam Questions page. Note: These resources do not reflect the 2018-19 redesign.

Exam Resources