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Below is a diverse selection of supplemental materials, including lesson plans and teaching strategies, from the College Board and your AP colleagues. Look for more classroom resources from your peers in the AP Teacher Community.

In August, you will be able to access more interactive tools in AP Classroom, including unit guides, progress checks and a dashboard to measure student progress, and a bank of real AP questions.

From The College Board

Analytical Reading Activities

The College Board has developed a suite of analytical reading activities for AP U.S. Government and Politics teachers.

The Analytical Reading Activities were developed by a team of master teachers to help you teach the nine required documents and implement the AP U.S. Government and Politics Disciplinary Practices and Reasoning Processes into your course.

The following features make these activities valuable and flexible resources for teachers and students:

  • Paired readings have students practice analyzing other primary sources, news articles, and scholarly works by political scientists.
  • Before, during, and after reading exercises help students connect the text to course content.
  • Guided questions appear alongside the paragraphs to help students analyze as they go, modeling proven approaches for student understanding.
  • Making connections with summative exercises guide students in connecting both readings to our government today.

These activities were designed to guide students in how to properly read, analyze, and annotate a text. And with the emphasis on multiple founding documents, students gain vital practice with complex and college-level readings that political scientists use in their work.

Log in to AP Classroom later in 2019 to access both the student and teacher versions of the following activities:

  1. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 1.1: Ideals of Democracy
    Required Document: excerpts from The Declaration of Independence
  2. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 1.3: Government Power and Individual Rights
    Required Documents: excerpts from Federalist 10 & excerpts from Brutus 1
  3. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 1.4: Challenges of the Articles of Confederation
    Required Document: excerpts from Articles of Confederation
  4. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 1.6: Principles of American Government
    Required Document: excerpts from Federalist 51
  5. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 1.8: Constitutional Interpretations of Federalism
    Required Document: The Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States
  6. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 2.6: The Expansion of Presidential Power
    Required Document: excerpts from Federalist 70
  7. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 2.8: The Judicial Branch
    Required Document: excerpts from Federalist 78
  8. Analytical Reading Activity Topic 3.10: Social Movements and Equal Protection
    Required Document: excerpts from Letter from a Birmingham Jail, by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

Data Analysis Activities

The College Board has developed a suite of data analysis activities for AP U.S. Government and Politics teachers.

The Data Analysis Activities were developed by a team of master teachers to help you implement the Data Analysis Disciplinary Practices into your course.

Log in to AP Classroom later in 2019 to access both the student and teacher versions of the following activities*:

  1. Data Analysis Activity Topic 2.2: Structures, Powers, and Functions of Congress
    Data related to Mandatory and Discretionary Spending
  2. Data Analysis Activity Topic 2.4: Roles and Powers of the President
    Data related to Number of Vetoes and Vetoes Overridden
  3. Data Analysis Activity Topic 2.14: Holding the Bureaucracy Accountable
    Data related to the Budget of a Bureaucratic Agency
  4. Data Analysis Activity Topic 2.15: Policy and the Branches of Government
    Data related to the Budget of a Bureaucratic Agency as Affected by Policy
  5. Data Analysis Activity Topic 4.2: Political Socialization
    Data related to Political Socialization
  6. Data Analysis Activity Topic 4.3: Changes in Ideology
    Data related to Ideology by Generation
  7. Data Analysis Activity Topic 4.5: Measuring Public Opinion
    Data related to Public Opinion Data
  8. Data Analysis Activity Topic 4.6: Evaluating Public Opinion Data
    Data related to Public Opinion Data
  9. Data Analysis Activity Topic 4.9: Ideology and Economic Policy
    Data related to Economic Policy and Ideology
  10. Data Analysis Activity Topic 5.2: Voter Turnout
    Data related to Voter Turnout
  11. Data Analysis Activity Topic 5.5: Third-Party Politics
    Data related to Third-Party Voting in Presidential Elections
  12. Data Analysis Activity Topic 5.6: Interest Groups Influencing Policy Making
    Data related to Interest Group Spending and Policy

*Individual activity subject/content subject to change.

Argumentation Activities

The College Board has developed a suite of argumentation activities for AP U.S. Government and Politics teachers.

The Argumentation Activities were developed by a team of master teachers to help you develop your students’ argumentation skills, teaching and practicing each component of the AP U.S. Government and Politics argumentation free-response question.

Log in to AP Classroom later in 2019 to access both the student and teacher versions of the following activities*:

  1. Argumentation Activity Topic 1.7: Relationship Between States and the Federal Government
    Articulating a defensible claim that establishes a line of reasoning on Federalism
  2. Argumentation Activity Topic 1.9: Federalism in Action
    Supporting an argument on Federalism using relevant evidence; builds on Topic 1.7 Activity
  3. Argumentation Activity Topic 3.3: First Amendment: Freedom of Speech
    Articulating a defensible claim that establishes a line of reasoning on whether Supreme Court rulings have expanded or limited individual rights
  4. Argumentation Activity Topic 3.6: Amendments: Balancing Individual Freedom with Public Order and Safety
    Supporting an argument on whether Supreme Court rulings have expanded or limited individual rights using relevant evidence; builds on Topic 3.3 Activity
  5. Argumentation Activity Topic 3.8: Amendments: Due Process and the Rights of the Accused
    Use reasoning to organize and analyze evidence (whether Supreme Court rulings have expanded or limited individual rights), explaining its significance to justify the claim/thesis; builds on Topic 3.6 Activity
  6. Argumentation Activity Topic 5.8: Electing a President
    Articulating a defensible claim that establishes a line of reasoning on the role of the president (using required documents)
  7. Argumentation Activity Topic 5.9: Congressional Elections
    Supporting an argument on the role of the president using relevant evidence from a list of required documents; builds on Topic 5.8 Activity
  8. Argumentation Activity Topic 5.10: Modern Campaigns
    Use reasoning to organize and analyze evidence (the role of the president), explaining its significance to justify the claim/thesis; builds on Topic 5.9 Activity
  9. Argumentation Activity Topic 5.12: The Media
    Use refutation, concession, or rebuttal to respond to an alternate perspective on the role of the president; builds on Topic 5.10 Activity

*Individual activity subject/content subject to change.

SCOTUS Case Analysis Activities

The College Board has developed a suite of Supreme Court Case Analysis activities for AP U.S. Government and Politics teachers that include the fifteen required cases.

The SCOTUS Case Analysis Activities were developed by a team of master teachers to help your students understand the key details for each of the required courses and then apply that information in various ways, informed by Disciplinary Practice 2.

Log in to AP Classroom later in 2019 to access both the student and teacher versions of the following activities:

  1. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 1.8: Constitutional Interpretations of Federalism
    McCulloch v. Maryland (1819) and United States v. Lopez (1995)
  2. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 2.3: Congressional Behavior
    Shaw v. Reno (1993) and Baker v. Carr (1962)
  3. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 2.8: The Judicial Branch
    Marbury v. Madison (1803)
  4. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.2: First Amendment: Freedom of Religion
    Wisconsin v. Yoder (1972)
  5. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.2: First Amendment: Freedom of Religion
    Engel v. Vitale (1962)
  6. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.3: First Amendment: Freedom of Speech
    Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969)
  7. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.3: First Amendment: Freedom of Speech
    Schenck v. United States (1919)
  8. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.4: First Amendment: Freedom of the Press
    New York Times Co. v. United States (1971)
  9. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.7: Selective Incorporation
    McDonald v. Chicago (2010)
  10. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.8: Amendments: Due Process and the Rights of the Accused
    Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)
  11. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.9: Amendments: Due Process and the Right to Privacy
    Roe v. Wade (1973)
  12. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 3.11: Government Responses to Social Movements
    Brown v. Board of Education (1954)
  13. SCOTUS Case Analysis Activity Topic 5.11: Campaign Finance
    Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (2010)

Lessons Developed with the National Constitution Center

Federalism, the Commerce Clause, and the Tenth Amendment:

The Constitution includes language that can be interpreted as supporting a nation-centered view of federalism and other areas that one could argue support a state-centered perspective. In order to help students develop a deeper understanding of the role of federalism, this lesson module uses the National Constitution Center's Interactive Constitution, which presents diverse interpretations of constitutional language, particularly that found in the enumerated powers of Article I, Section 8 and in the Tenth Amendment. Students read and analyze these diverse interpretations and draw conclusions about how federalism has been understood and implemented over time. The Leader's Notes (.pdf/1.43MB) and Student Handbook (.pdf/891KB) are available for your use.

The Development and Application of the First Amendment:

This lesson focuses on the First Amendment, its origins, and how it has been interpreted. Using Writing Rights: The Bill of Rights, the National Constitution Center’s interactive website, students trace the origins of the First Amendment in order to deepen their understanding of the rights it protects. Students then investigate and discuss how the Supreme Court has interpreted and applied the amendment to different conflict scenarios in landmark cases. The Leader’s Notes (.pdf/1.27MB) and Student Handbook (.pdf/924KB) are available for your use.

Special Focus Materials

Note: These Special Focus Materials do not reflect the 2018-19 redesign.