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AP provides flexible resources to support all students and teachers—whether they are working virtually, in-school, or in a blended classroom environment. Teachers can use these instructional resources to incorporate daily practice into their lessons and give students daily feedback on their progress, via mobile devices, computers, and/or paper.  

AP Classroom

Sign in to AP Classroom and explore these resources:

  • Topic questions are formative questions to check student understanding as you teach. Assign topic questions to reveal student misunderstandings and target your lessons.
  • Progress checks help you gauge student knowledge and skills for each unit through:
    • multiple-choice questions with rationales explaining correct and incorrect answers, and
    • free-response questions with scoring guides to help you evaluate student work.
  • In response to teacher feedback, the personal progress checks for AP English Language and Composition are updated to more closely represent the AP Exam:
    • Each unit’s multiple-choice section now requires students to read no more than 2–4 passages.
    • Each passage is paired with 5–7 questions and no passages repeat throughout the course.
    • Passages reflect a greater degree of political and cultural responsiveness where appropriate.
  • The progress dashboard highlights progress for every student and class across AP units.
  • The question bank is a searchable database of real AP questions. You can:
    • find topic questions and practice exam questions, indexed by content and skills.
    • search for any question, passage, or stimulus by text or keyword.
    • create custom quizzes that can be assigned online or on paper.

Learn how to get started in AP Classroom.

AP Community

Sign In to the AP English Community

  • Share real-time strategies, ask questions, and collaborate with teachers worldwide.
  • Search, add, and rate teacher resources with your peers in the resource library.
  • Daily or weekly digests help you keep up with your community, wherever you are. Select all discussions or just the topics and discussion threads you choose to follow. You can also reply to discussion posts through email.

Learn more about the AP Community.

AP Daily

  • Ready-made for any learning environment, AP teachers can use new, short videos on every topic and skill to support in-person, online, and blended learning.
  • Unit 1 videos are coming this fall. Videos for later units will roll out throughout the year.

From College Board

Lessons Developed with the National Constitution Center


Argument: In this lesson, students will encounter some differing and subtle interpretations of the amendments in the Bill of Rights. They will be asked to consider these perspectives as they develop their own arguments considering historic Supreme Court cases and their own interpretations of the law. They will then be asked to develop a complete argument in essay form that considers different perspectives. Leader’s Notes (.pdf/1.59MB), Student Handbooks (.pdf/1.1MB), and handouts (.pdf/1.11MB) are available for your use.

Precision of Language: In this lesson, students will encounter historic drafts of the amendments in the Bill of Rights and examine how some of the revisions in those drafts may have affected the later interpretation of those amendments. Once students have a more developed understanding of the role of revision in clarifying a text, they will work with their own texts to do the same. Leader’s Notes (.pdf/1.46MB), Student Handbooks (.pdf/1.1MB), and handouts (.pdf/1.11MB) are available for your use

From Your AP Colleagues

Pedagogy