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AP resources are designed to support all students and teachers—with daily instruction, practice, and feedback to help cover and connect content and skills—in any learning environment.

AP Daily

Sign in to AP Classroom to access AP Daily.

  • Made for any learning environment, AP teachers can assign these short videos on every skill and/or required reading as homework alongside topic questions, warm-ups, lectures, reviews, and more.
  • AP students can also access videos on their own for additional support.
  • Unit 1 videos are available now in AP Classroom, on your homepage under Unit 1.
  • Unit 1 and Unit 2 videos are available now in AP Classroom, with Unit 3 videos coming soon. We’ll release more units throughout the year.

AP Daily Instructors

Expert AP teachers across the country can support your course virtually:

  • Lead teacher: Dawn Knight, Westfield High School, Zionsville, IN
  • Alfonso Correa, School for the Talented and Gifted, Dallas, TX
  • Greg Jones, Duluth East High School, Duluth, MN
  • Aaron Gillego, Pine Crest School, Oakland Park, FL
  • John Zainea, Chelsea High School, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Timm Freitas, Whitinsville Christian School, Uxbridge, MA
  • Jacqueline Rackard, Broward County Public Schools, Lauderhill, FL
  • Stephanie Hyatt, Lee High School, Huntsville, AL

Higher Education Faculty Lecturers

Supplement your instruction with 30-minute videos on each unit hosted by college or university professors. Guest lecturers include:

  • Tamara Black, University of Southern California
  • Jonathan Bush, Western Michigan University
  • Irene Clark, California State University, Northridge
  • Denise Comer, Duke University
  • Thomas Hitchner, University of California, Los Angeles
  • David Jolliffe, University of Arkansas
  • Michael Neal, Florida State University
  • Carl Whithaus, University of California, Davis
  • Danielle Zawodny Wetzel, Carnegie Mellon University

 The Unit 1 Faculty Lecture is available on the AP Classroom homepage, on your course tab, as well as YouTube.

AP Classroom

Sign in to AP Classroom and explore these resources:

  • AP Daily videos are short, instructional segments with searchable captions you can:
    • Assign to students before or after class to maximize time for discussion.
    • Assign alongside topic questions to address misunderstandings.
    • Encourage students to take advantage of on their own, on mobile devices or computers.
    • Track to see which students are watching each video in each class. 
  • Topic questions are formative questions to check student understanding as you teach. Assign topic questions to reveal student misunderstandings and target your lessons.
  • Progress checks help you gauge student knowledge and skills for each unit through:
    • multiple-choice questions with rationales explaining correct and incorrect answers, and
    • free-response questions with scoring guides to help you evaluate student work.
  • The progress dashboard highlights progress for every student and class across AP units.
  • The question bank is a searchable database of real AP questions. You can:
    • find topic questions and practice exam questions, indexed by content and skills.
    • search for any question, passage, or stimulus by text or keyword.
    • create custom quizzes that can be assigned online or on paper.

Learn how to get started in AP Classroom.

AP Community

Sign in to the AP English Community.

  • Share real-time strategies, ask questions, and collaborate with teachers worldwide.
  • Search, add, and rate teacher resources with your peers in the resource library.
  • Daily or weekly digests help you keep up with your community, wherever you are. Select all discussions or just the topics and discussion threads you choose to follow. You can also reply to discussion posts through email.

Learn more about the AP Community.

Additional Resources for AP English Language and Composition

Lessons Developed with the National Constitution Center

Argument: In this lesson, students will encounter some differing and subtle interpretations of the amendments in the Bill of Rights. They will be asked to consider these perspectives as they develop their own arguments considering historic Supreme Court cases and their own interpretations of the law. They will then be asked to develop a complete argument in essay form that considers different perspectives. Leader’s Notes (.pdf/1.59MB), Student Handbooks (.pdf/1.1MB), and handouts (.pdf/1.11MB) are available for your use.

Precision of Language: In this lesson, students will encounter historic drafts of the amendments in the Bill of Rights and examine how some of the revisions in those drafts may have affected the later interpretation of those amendments. Once students have a more developed understanding of the role of revision in clarifying a text, they will work with their own texts to do the same. Leader’s Notes (.pdf/1.46MB), Student Handbooks (.pdf/1.1MB), and handouts (.pdf/1.11MB) are available for your use.

Civic Knowledge and Action Project: Voter Registration Lesson Plan

The Civic Knowledge and Action Project is a collaboration of College Board and DoSomething.org, a nonpartisan nonprofit focused on youth-led volunteering initiatives, to develop opportunities for students to make a difference in their local communities. Through this project, we’ve created optional classroom materials to make it simple for AP English Language and Composition teachers to integrate lessons about civics and democracy into the course.

For the voter registration project, DoSomething.org will provide interested students with a voter registration toolkit, which they can use to run online voter registration drives in their school and communities. Visit the Civic Knowledge and Action Project page to help your students run online voter registration drives.

From Your AP Colleagues

Pedagogy