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Important Updates

Support for Students and Schools Impacted by Coronavirus
In response to school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re offering at-home testing for 2020 AP Exams. Note that any related adjustments to 2020 AP Exams, such as length or content covered, may not be reflected on all AP Central pages. Visit Taking the Exams for the latest exam information.

New Secure Practice Exam
A new secure AP Latin practice exam is now available on the AP Course Audit site and in the AP Classroom question bank. The practice exam matches this year’s exam specifications and includes scoring guidelines and a scoring worksheet. Note: the scoring worksheet uses past averages, so the cut score ranges may not fully align with the 2020 exam standards.

You continue to have access to the 2018 and 2012 secure practice exams, which align with the 2020 exam specifications. All are available as practice exams on the AP Course Audit site and as individual questions in the question bank. 

As a reminder, these exams are most appropriate for student practice late in the school year, as the exam date approaches.

Get Real-Time Feedback from Personal Progress Checks
Personal progress checks in AP Classroom are a great way to ensure your students are continuing to build mastery of content and skills. The real-time results can help you and your students prioritize additional practice before the AP Exam.

Sign In to AP Classroom

Exam Overview

Exam questions assess the course concepts and skills outlined in the course framework. For more information on exam weighting, download the AP Latin Course and Exam Description (CED). Scoring guidelines for each of the sample free-response questions in the CED are also available.

Encourage your students to visit the AP Latin student page for exam information and exam practice.

  • Event
    • TUE, MAY 12, 2020, NOON ET

    AP Latin Exam Day

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Exam Format

The AP Latin Exam will continue to have consistent question types, weighting, and rubrics every year, so you and your students know what to expect on exam day. The overall format of the exam—including the weighting, timing, types of questions, and types of stimulus materials won’t change.

Section 1: Multiple Choice

50 Questions | 1 Hour | 50% of Exam Score

  • Syllabus Reading: Vergil (10–12 questions)
  • Syllabus Reading: Caesar (10–12 questions)
  • Sight Reading: Poetry (13–15 questions)
  • Sight Reading: Prose (13–15 questions)
  • Students will be asked to:
    • demonstrate knowledge of Latin vocabulary
    • explain the meaning of Latin words and phrases in context
    • use specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures
    • demonstrate knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts
    • scan dactylic hexameter in Latin poetry
    • identify stylistic features in Latin poetry and prose
    • identify references to Roman culture, history, and mythology in Latin texts
    • demonstrate overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts
    • demonstrate knowledge of Roman culture and historical events

 Section 2: Free Response

5 Questions | 2 Hours (includes a 15-minute reading period) | 50% of Exam Score

  • Translation: Vergil (1 passage, approximately 35 words) and Caesar (1 passage, approximately 40 words)
  • Analytical essay (1 prompt, 2 passages in Latin)
    • Students will be asked to analyze either 2 Vergil passages, 2 Caesar passages, or 1 Vergil passage and 1 Caesar passage. (poetry 12–16 lines, prose 80–120 words)
    • Students will need to analyze the effects of language usage and stylistic features, supporting their argument using relevant evidence from the texts and readings in English.
  • Short answer: Vergil (1 passage of 5–10 lines with 5–7 questions) and Caesar (1 passage of 50–75 words with 5–7 questions)

Exam Questions and Scoring Information

For free-response questions from the 2019 exam, along with scoring information, check out the table below.

Be sure to review the Chief Reader Report (available this fall). In this invaluable resource, the chief reader of the AP Exam compiles feedback from members of the AP Reading leadership to explain how students performed on the FRQs, summarize typical student errors, and address specific concepts and content with which students have struggled the most that year.

2019: Free-Response Questions