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The four sample choices in this section will help you customize the tutorial to meet the needs of your classroom. Choose from Vergil, Caesar, Sight Passage (Poetry), or Sight Passage (Prose) below.

Sample Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions—Vergil

Dido makes a complaint

  1. "Dissimulare etiam sperasti, perfide, tantum
  2. posse nefas tacitusque mea decedere terra?
  3. Nec te noster amor nec te data dextera quondam
  4. nec moritura tenet crudeli funere Dido?
  5. Quin etiam hiberno moliri sidere classem
  6. et mediis properas Aquilonibus ire per altum,
  7. crudelis? Quid, si non arva aliena domosque
  8. ignotas peteres, et Troia antiqua maneret,
  9. Troia per undosum peteretur classibus aequor?
  10. Mene fugis? Per ego has lacrimas dextramque tuam te
  11. (quando aliud mihi iam miserae nihil ipsa reliqui),
  12. per conubia nostra, per inceptos hymenaeos,
  13. si bene quid de te merui, fuit aut tibi quicquam
  14. dulce meum, miserere domus labentis et istam,
  15. oro, si quis adhuc precibus locus, exue mentem."

Multiple-Choice Questions

  1. In line 1, the object of Dissimulare is

    1. perfide (line 1)
    2. nefas (line 2)
    3. tacitus (line 2)
    4. terra (line 2)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  2. To whom does perfide (line 1) refer?

    1. Juno
    2. Cupid
    3. Aeneas
    4. Iarbus

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  3. In line 1, tantum modifies

    1. Dissimulare (line 1)
    2. perfide (line 1)
    3. nefas (line 2)
    4. decedere (line 2)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  4. In line 2, -que connects

    1. Dissimulare (line 1) and decedere (line 2)
    2. perfide (line 1) and posse (line 2)
    3. tacitus (line 2) and mea (line 2)
    4. tacitus (line 2) and terra (line 2)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  5. In line 2, terra refers to

    1. Sicily
    2. Troy
    3. Italy
    4. Carthage

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  6. In lines 1–2 (Dissimulare... terra), the speaker asks whether the addressee hoped to

    1. conceal a departure
    2. accomplish great things
    3. avoid wrongdoing
    4. maintain silence on earth

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  7. In line 3, data dextera quondam is translated

    1. the things given previously to [my] right hand
    2. my right hand previously given [to you]
    3. since favorable things are given [to you]
    4. when [my] right hand gives things

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  8. In line 4, moritura modifies

    1. amor (line 3)
    2. dextera (line 3)
    3. funere (line 4)
    4. Dido (line 4)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  9. In line 6, et connects

    1. Quin (line 5) and per (line 6)
    2. hiberno (line 5) and sidere (line 5)
    3. moliri (line 5) and ire (line 6)
    4. classem (line 5) and mediis (line 6)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  10. Lines 5–7 (Quin etiam ... crudelis) refer to which of the following actions?

    1. Sailing in rough weather
    2. Preparing winter quarters
    3. Traveling through mountains
    4. Navigating by the stars

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  11. The words si... peteres (lines 7–8) tell us that Aeneas

    1. is not happy in these lands that are not his
    2. is headed for unknown lands belonging to others
    3. is sought by enemies from a foreign land
    4. has passed through unknown lands belonging to others

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

       

  12. In line 9, classibus is

    1. dative of agent
    2. dative of purpose
    3. ablative of means
    4. ablative of manner

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  13. The metrical pattern of the first four feet of line 9 (Troia ... aequor) is

    1. spondee-spondee-dactyl-spondee
    2. dactyl-spondee-dactyl-spondee
    3. spondee-dactyl-spondee-spondee
    4. dactyl-dactyl-dactyl-spondee

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student scans dactylic hexameter in Latin poetry

  14. Mene fugis (line 10) is translated

    1. May you not flee
    2. Do not flee me
    3. Are you fleeing me?
    4. Why do you flee me?

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  15. In line 10, te is the object of

    1. Per (line 10)
    2. reliqui (line 11)
    3. merui (line 13)
    4. oro (line 15)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  16. Line 11 (quando aliud mihi iam miserae nihil ipsa reliqui) is translated

    1. since I myself have now left nothing other for wretched me
    2. since nothing else has been left for poor me now
    3. when she herself left nothing other than poor me
    4. when another thing left nothing for me, a wretched woman

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  17. Which of the following figures of speech occurs in lines 10–12 (Per... hymenaeos)?

    1. Litotes
    2. Tmesis
    3. Anaphora
    4. Polysyndeton

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student identifies stylistic features in Latin poetry and prose.

  18. Which of the following are associated with Roman conubia (line 12)?

    1. Death masks
    2. Gladiatorial games
    3. Theatrical performances
    4. Lighted torches

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student identifies references to Roman culture, history, and mythology in Latin texts.

  19. In line 13, quid is translated

    1. that
    2. which
    3. anythings
    4. someone

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student explains the meaning of specific Latin words and phrases in context.

  20. From lines 13–14 (si ... meum), we can infer that Dido

    1. expects to be punished
    2. thinks she deserves better treatment
    3. considers herself sweet in every respect
    4. needs to do something well

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  21. In line 14, the case and number of domus are

    1. nominative singular
    2. genitive singular
    3. nominative plural
    4. accusative plural

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  22. In line 14, istam modifies

    1. quicquam (line 13)
    2. dulce (line 14)
    3. meum (line 14)
    4. mentem (line 15)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  23. In line 15, quis modifies

    1. domus (line 14)
    2. labentis (line 14)
    3. precibus (line 15)
    4. locus (line 15)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  24. The form of miserere (line 14) and exue (line 15) is

    1. infinitive
    2. imperative
    3. participle
    4. supine

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  25. Where does the addressee of the passage first travel after leaving?

    1. Sicily
    2. Troy
    3. Latium
    4. The underworld

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses knowledge of mythology and legends to demonstrate understanding of the Latin texts.

  26. Which of the following features of epic is mentioned in the passage?

    1. A dangerous sea journey
    2. An invocation to the muse
    3. An intervention by the gods
    4. A preparation for battle

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses knowledge of authors or literary conventions to demonstrate understanding of the Latin texts.

 

Answers

 

  1. B
  2. C
  3. C
  4. A
  5. D
  6. A
  7. B
  8. D
  9. C
  10. A
  11. B
  12. C
  13. B
  14. C
  15. D
  16. A
  17. C
  18. D
  19. C
  20. B
  21. B
  22. D
  23. D
  24. B
  25. A
  26. A

Sample Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions—Caesar

British envoys come to Caesar.

  1. Hostes proelio superati, simul atque se ex fuga receperunt, statim ad Caesarem legatos de pace
  2. miserunt; obsides sese daturos quaeque imperasset facturos polliciti sunt. Una cum his legatis
  3. Commius Atrebas venit, quem supra demonstraveram a Caesare in Britanniam praemissum. Hunc illi e
  4. navi egressum, cum ad eos oratoris modo Caesaris mandata deferret, comprehenderant atque in
  5. vincula coniecerant; tum proelio facto remiserunt et in petenda pace eius rei culpam in multitudinem
  6. contulerunt et propter imprudentiam ut ignosceretur petiverunt. Caesar questus quod, cum ultro in
  7. continentem legatis missis pacem ab se petissent, bellum sine causa intulissent, ignoscere se imprudentiae dixit obsidesque imperavit

Multiple-Choice Questions

  1. The words simul atque se ex fuga receperunt (line 1) tell us that the Britons

    1. withstood the urge to flee
    2. reassembled after fleeing
    3. welcomed those who fled to them
    4. fled as soon as they could

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  2. The object of facturos (line 2) is

    1. Hostes (line 1)
    2. legatos (line 1)
    3. obsides (line 2)
    4. quae imperasset (line 2)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  3. Which of the following grammatical constructions occurs in line 2 (obsides... polliciti sunt)?

    1. An indirect question
    2. An indirect command
    3. An indirect statement
    4. A passive periphrastic

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  4. According to line 2 (obsides... facturos), the Britons promised Caesar that they would

    1. supply his army
    2. return the Roman hostages
    3. inform him of their plans
    4. obey his commands

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  5. In lines 2–3 (Una... praemissum), we learn that Commius Atrebas

    1. had been sent to Britain earlier by Caesar
    2. had shown Caesar around Britain
    3. had described Britain to Caesar
    4. had made a promise to Caesar about the Britons

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  6. The case of oratoris (line 4) depends on

    1. navi (line 3)
    2. eos (line 4)
    3. modo (line 4)
    4. mandata (line 4)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  7. The object of comprehenderant (line 4) and coniecerant (line 4) is

    1. Hunc (line 3)
    2. eos (line 4)
    3. mandata (line 4)
    4. vincula (line 4)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  8. According to lines 3–4 (Hunc... coniecerant), how did the Britons react to Commius Atrebas' efforts on behalf of Caesar?

    1. They invited him to leave the ship and talk with them.
    2. They understood his concern and planned a response.
    3. They took counsel and decided to eject him from the camp.
    4. They seized him and put him in chains.

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  9. In line 5, eius rei refers to the

    1. flight of the Britons
    2. giving of hostages
    3. treatment of Commius Atrebas
    4. decision to obey Caesar's orders

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  10. In line 5, in multitudinem is translated

    1. onto the common people
    2. among the crowd
    3. for the majority
    4. in great numbers

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  11. In line 6, ut introduces

    1. a result clause
    2. a conditional clause
    3. a purpose clause
    4. a temporal clause

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

       

  12. In lines 5–6 (in petenda... petiverunt), what claim did the envoys make?

    1. Caesar had already forgiven them.
    2. The common people were to blame.
    3. They have already acknowledged their misdeeds.
    4. They had changed their ways.

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  13. In line 6, quod is translated

    1. what
    2. which
    3. because
    4. why

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student explains the meaning of specific Latin words and phrases in context.

  14. In line 6, continentem is translated

    1. holding together
    2. continuous
    3. the mainland
    4. the captor

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student explains the meaning of specific Latin words and phrases in context.

  15. What is the grammatical function of legatis missis (line 6)?

    1. Dative of agent
    2. Double dative
    3. Ablative of means
    4. Ablative absolute

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  16. In lines 6–7 (cum ... intulissent), we learn that the Britons

    1. urged the envoys to threaten war although they had no cause
    2. waged war without cause although they had sought peace
    3. thought they had no reason to seek peace
    4. attacked Caesar rather than first seeking peace

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  17. The case of imprudentiae (line 7) is

    1. genitive
    2. dative
    3. nominative
    4. vocative

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  18. In lines 7–8 (ignoscere... imperavit), we learn that Caesar's reaction to the Britons' plea was

    1. ignored
    2. conciliatory
    3. imprudent
    4. disappointing

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  19. Which feature of Roman warfare is found in the passage?

    1. The taking of enemy hostages
    2. The conscription of native peoples
    3. The general's urging on the troops in battle
    4. The punishment of mutinous soldiers

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student relates Roman cultural practices in the Latin texts to perspectives of Roman culture.

  20. In what situation elsewhere in the Bellum Gallicum does Caesar react in a similar way?

    1. In his treatment of the Helvetians after their defeat
    2. In his rescue of C. Valerius Procillus after his capture by Ariovistus
    3. In his crossing the Rhine back into Gaul after his attack on the Germans
    4. In his treatment of the defenders of Avaricum after he enters the city

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses knowledge of influential people and key historical events to demonstrate understanding of Latin texts.

  21. The passage departs from the usual style of the Commentarii because it contains an example of Caesar

    1. recording an oration in direct speech
    2. making frequent use of figures of speech
    3. providing a physical description of a character
    4. referring to himself in the first person

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses knowledge of authors or literary conventions to demonstrate understanding of the Latin texts.

 

Answers

 

  1. B
  2. D
  3. C
  4. D
  5. A
  6. C
  7. A
  8. D
  9. C
  10. A
  11. C
  12. B
  13. C
  14. C
  15. D
  16. B
  17. B
  18. B
  19. A
  20. A
  21. D

Sample Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions—Sight Passage (Poetry)

A request from an admirer.

  1. Quod cupis in nostris dicique legique libellis
  2. et nonnullus honos creditur iste tibi,
  3. ne valeam1 si non res est gratissima nobis
  4. et volo te chartis inseruisse meis.
  5. Sed tu nomen habes averso fonte2 sororum3
  6. impostum,4 mater quod tibi dura dedit;
  7. quod nec Melpomene,5 quod nec Polyhymnia6 possit
  8. nec pia cum Phoebo7 dicere Calliope.8
  9. Ergo aliquod gratum Musis tibi nomen adopta;
  10. non semper belle dicitur "Hippodame."

1ne valeam: "may I perish"
2averso fonte: "bad inspiration," "inappropriate source"
3sororum: "of the sisters" or "of the Muses"
4inpostum = impositum
5Melpomene: one of the Muses
6Polyhymnia: one of the Muses
7Phoebus, -i, m.: Apollo
8Calliope: one of the Muses


Multiple-Choice Questions

  1. In line 1, legi is translated

    1. I gathered
    2. by law
    3. to be read
    4. having been chosen

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  2. The case and number of libellis (line 1) are

    1. nominative singular
    2. genitive singular
    3. dative plural
    4. ablative plural

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  3. In line 2, iste refers to the

    1. poet himself
    2. poet's mention of the woman in verse
    3. woman's poetry that the poet has read
    4. woman's beliefs

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  4. From the words ne valeam... meis (lines 3–4), we learn that the poet

    1. would rather die than grant the woman's request
    2. claims to have used too much paper for his poetry
    3. finds the woman's request most pleasing
    4. thanks the woman for pointing out an error in his poem

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  5. In line 4, chartis refers to the same thing as

    1. libellis (line 1)
    2. honos (line 2)
    3. res (line 3)
    4. nobis (line 3)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student explains the meaning of specific Latin words and phrases in context.

  6. In line 4, te is

    1. in apposition with res (line 3)
    2. the subject of inseruisse (line 4)
    3. the object of inseruisse (line 4)
    4. the object of volo (line 4)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  7. In the words Sed... impostum (lines 5–6), we learn that the woman has

    1. a bad reputation
    2. no talent as a poet
    3. a suggestion for the title of a poem
    4. an unattractive name

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  8. The words mater quod tibi dura dedit (line 6) are translated

    1. which your hard-hearted mother has given you
    2. because your mother has done terrible things to you
    3. a mother who has given up many things for you
    4. endure the things that your mother has given you

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  9. Each time quod appears in lines 6–7, it refers to

    1. nomen (line 5)
    2. fonte (line 5)
    3. sororum (line 5)
    4. Phoebo (line 8)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  10. Which of the following figures of speech occurs in lines 7–8 (quod... Calliope)?

    1. Metonymy
    2. Polysyndeton
    3. Chiasmus
    4. Litotes

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student identifies stylistic features in Latin poetry and prose.

  11. In line 8, cum is translated

    1. when
    2. since
    3. although
    4. with

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student explains the meaning of specific Latin words and phrases in context.

       

  12. The metrical pattern of the first four feet of line 9 (Ergo... adopta) is

    1. dactyl-dactyl-spondee-dactyl
    2. spondee-spondee-dactyl-dactyl
    3. dactyl-spondee-spondee-dactyl
    4. dactyl-spondee-dactyl-spondee

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student scans dactylic hexameter in Latin poetry.

  13. The case of Musis (line 9) is determined by

    1. Ergo (line 9)
    2. gratum (line 9)
    3. tibi (line 9)
    4. adopta (line 9)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  14. Which part of speech is the word belle (line 10)?

    1. Noun
    2. Verb
    3. Adjective
    4. Adverb

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  15. In the passage, we learn that the poet does not like

    1. the woman's mother
    2. his own poetry
    3. the woman's name
    4. the Muses

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  16. Which of the following characteristics of Roman poets is illustrated in the passage?

    1. They had wealthy people as patrons.
    2. They attributed inspiration to the Muses.
    3. They followed Greek poetic models.
    4. They read their poetry aloud in public.

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student relates Roman cultural practices in Latin texts to perspectives of Roman culture.

 

Answers

 

  1. C
  2. D
  3. B
  4. C
  5. A
  6. C
  7. D
  8. A
  9. A
  10. B
  11. D
  12. C
  13. B
  14. D
  15. C
  16. B

Sample Passages and Multiple-Choice Questions—Sight Passage (Prose)

A question is discussed in the Senate.

  1. Quattuor sunt provinciae, Patres conscripti, de quibus adhuc1 intellego sententias esse dictas,
  2. Galliae duae, quas hoc tempore uno imperio videmus esse coniunctas et Syria [et] Macedonia,
  3. quas vobis invitis et oppressis pestiferi2 illi consules pro perversae3 rei publicae praemiis
  4. occupaverunt. Decernandae nobis sunt lege Sempronia duae. Quid est quod possimus de Syria
  5. [et] Macedonia dubitare? Mitto4 quod eas ita partes habent ii, qui nunc obtinent, ut non ante
  6. attigerint5 quam6 hunc ordinem condemnarint, quam auctoritatem vestram e civitate
  7. exterminarint,7 quam fidem publicam, quam perpetuam populi Romani salutem, quam me ac
  8. meos omnes foedissime crudelissimeque vexarint.

1adhuc, adv.: up until now, this far, already
2pestiferus, -a, -um, adj.: deadly, dangerous, destructive
3perverto, -tere, -ti, -sum: overturn, upset, ruin, lead astray
4Mitto, -ere: pass over
5attingo, -ere, -tigi, tactum: gain possession or control of
6ante... quam = antequam
7extermino, -are: root out


Multiple-Choice Questions

  1. Patres conscripti (line 1) refers to

    1. all Roman fathers
    2. members of the Senate
    3. members of the equestrian class
    4. ambassadors to Rome

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student identifies references to Roman culture, history, and mythology in Latin texts.

  2. The antecedent of quibus (line 1) is

    1. Quattuor (line 1)
    2. provinciae (line 1)
    3. Patres (line 1)
    4. sententias (line 1)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts

  3. In line 1 (Quattuor ... dictas), we learn that

    1. four senators have opinions about the provinces
    2. certain provinces are well understood by the fathers
    3. the author knows that certain provinces have been discussed
    4. the author intends to write opinions about four provinces

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  4. In line 2, hoc tempore is an ablative of

    1. time when
    2. specification
    3. description
    4. manner

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  5. In line 2, uno imperio videmus esse coniunctas is translated

    1. we know that there is joint rule in one province
    2. we see that they have been added to one empire
    3. we know that one general has conquered them
    4. we see that they have been joined under one command

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  6. In line 3, the grammatical function of vobis invitis et oppressis is

    1. indirect object
    2. ablative of separation
    3. dative with a compound verb
    4. ablative absolute

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  7. In line 4, the subject of occupaverunt is

    1. Syria [et] Macedonia (line 2)
    2. consules (line 3)
    3. rei (line 3)
    4. publicae (line 3)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  8. From lines 1–4 (Quattuor... occupaverunt), we can infer that Syria and Macedonia

    1. became provinces of Gaul
    2. were joined under one command
    3. suffered the loss of freedom
    4. sought to join the empire

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  9. In line 4, Decernandae nobis sunt is translated

    1. We are going to assign
    2. We have assigned
    3. We must assign
    4. They have been assigned by us

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  10. In line 4, lege means

    1. law
    2. read
    3. choose
    4. legion

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student explains the meaning of specific Latin words and phrases in context.

  11. In line 4, quod is translated

    1. which
    2. because
    3. whom
    4. whereas

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student explains the meaning of specific Latin words and phrases in context.

       

  12. The antecedent of qui (line 5) is

    1. Syria [et] Macedonia; (lines 4–5)
    2. partes (line 5)
    3. ii (line 5)
    4. the understood subject of Mitto (line 5)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  13. In line 6, attigerint is subjunctive in

    1. a purpose clause
    2. a fearing clause
    3. a result clause
    4. an indirect command

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures.

  14. In lines 5–6, ante ... quam hunc ordinem condemnarint is translated

    1. before they condemned this order
    2. before which this order would be condemned
    3. they will have condemned this order before
    4. before this order which they condemn

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  15. In line 6, auctoritatem refers to

    1. influence and ability to rally political support
    2. a statute determining power or jurisdiction
    3. the ability to originate a political movement
    4. a step in the cursus honorum leading to the consulship

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student identifies references to Roman culture, history, and mythology in texts.

  16. In line 7, fidem publicam is the object of

    1. habent (line 5)
    2. condemnarint (line 6)
    3. exterminarint (line 7)
    4. vexarint (line 8)

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.

  17. What stylistic device is used in lines 6–7 (quam... publicam)?

    1. Apostrophe
    2. Anaphora
    3. Litotes
    4. Polysyndeton

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student identifies stylistic features in Latin poetry and prose.

  18. In lines 7–8 (quam fidem... vexarint), we learn that

    1. the consuls had abused both the speaker personally and his supporters
    2. the offenses of the Roman people were very cruel and foul
    3. the public trust and the health of Rome were utterly destroyed
    4. the speaker's own trusted people had vexed the Roman state most cruelly

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student demonstrates overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

  19. A consul would want to be appointed to govern a province after his term because it was

    1. a requirement to stand for reelection in the future
    2. a way to amass an enormous private fortune
    3. an opportunity to expend wealth to benefit the state
    4. a pleasant place to retire from public responsibility

    Targeted Learning Objective:

    • The student uses knowledge of Roman political ideas to demonstrate understanding of Roman culture in the Latin texts.

 

Answers

 

  1. B
  2. B
  3. C
  4. A
  5. D
  6. D
  7. B
  8. C
  9. C
  10. A
  11. A
  12. C
  13. C
  14. A
  15. A
  16. D
  17. B
  18. A
  19. B