Why do the task directions state that the procedure must have an algorithm that includes sequencing, selection, and iteration, but the scoring guidelines allow students to earn row 5 even if their algorithm is not in a procedure?

Print this page
beginning of content:

Written response 3C is assessed using two rubric rows: rows 4 and 5. In row 4, students are being assessed on whether they have a procedure with a parameter and can describe what the procedure does and how it contributed to the overall function of the program. In row 5, students are being assessed on whether they can write a complex algorithm that incorporates sequencing, selection, and iteration, as well as whether they can explain how the algorithm works. We consider three scenarios for the program code and how students would earn points. The written response for 3C contains:

  • a procedure with parameter(s) that has an algorithm that includes sequencing, selection, and iteration. In this case, the response is eligible to earn points for both rows 4 and 5 depending on what is written.
  • a procedure with a parameter, but the algorithm does not have sequencing, selection, and iteration. In this case, the response is eligible to earn row 4 depending on what is written, but not row 5.
  • an algorithm that contains sequencing, selection, and iteration. In this case, the response will not earn row 4, but is eligible to earn row 5 depending on what is written.

Essentially, this means that a student who doesn’t understand how to write a procedure, but can write a complex algorithm, can still earn one of the two points, rather than automatically being ineligible for both of points for written response 3C.